Dorothea dix the humanitarian reformer for mental illness

Dix was born on April 4,in Hampden, Maine. Her father, Joseph Dix, was an alcoholic and circuit-riding Methodist preacher who required young Dorothea to spend her time laboriously stitching and pasting the thick religious tracts he wrote and sold during his travels. Although considered a strict and sometimes abusive father, Joseph Dix taught his daughter to read and write at an early age.

Dorothea dix the humanitarian reformer for mental illness

Nursing Theories and a Philosophy of Nursing Dorothea Dix, Mental Health Advocate Dorothea Dix was a self-educated woman who had several successful careers, but she is best known for laying the foundation for humane and therapeutic care of the mentally ill. Her efforts still shape the care given in mental institutions today.

Dorothea dix the humanitarian reformer for mental illness

Growing up in Maine, she felt neglected and was very unhappy. Her father was a book dealer and lay minister who moved the family often. Dorothea resented the moves and the fact that he expected her to help prepare religious tracts that promoted hellfire and God's wrath. Her mother, a very self-absorbed woman, provided little support for the young girl.

At the age of 12, Dix ran away to live with her grandmother in Boston and later with an aunt in Massachusetts. Although she received very little formal education, she was always intellectually curious and studied many subjects in-depth, attended lectures and surrounded herself with knowledgeable people.

These traits served her well in later years. For many years, Dix struggled with her feelings about religion. She agreed with the moral principles but could find no spiritual satisfaction.

Finally, in the s, she found her home with the Unitarians. She responded positively to their teachings of the goodness of God, which was in complete contrast to her earlier experiences.

Her correspondence of many years with Anne Heath, a fellow Unitarian, gives an insight into Dix's love of learning as well as her insecurities and loneliness.

Although Dorothea Dix was successful in bringing about great changes for the mentally ill, at the end of her life she was depressed because more progress had not been made. She died in at the age of 85 and is buried in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Career Dix's career as a teacher began when she was In spite of her lack of formal schooling, her self-education and maturity prompted her to open a successful private school in Worcester, Massachusetts, where she lived with her aunt.

When she moved to Boston in to be with her grandmother, she opened a school for young girls there. Her concern for the poor led her to open a free evening school for underprivileged children, one of the first in the United States. During this time she also wrote a number of children's books including Conversations On Common Things: Inill health most likely caused by long hours and lack of sleep prompted her to take an extended leave from teaching.

After some time in England with friends, she returned to the United States but was still not well enough to return to teaching. She supported herself with funds from her grandmother's estate and royalties from her books. It was in that a seemingly random event occurred that would change Dix's life and the lives of so many others.

A ministerial student who was unsuccessful in teaching a Bible class to women in jail asked Dix for advice.Dorothea Lynde Dix ( - ) By Vasantha Reddi, PhD, MHES. An early nursing pioneer, Dorothea Lynde Dix was a noted humanitarian, reformer, educator and crusader.

Dorothea Dix | History of American Women

She is perhaps best known for her patient advocacy in fighting to improve the conditions of jails and mental asylums in North America and Europe. Mental hygiene, the professional admission paper writers website for university science of maintaining mental health and preventing the development Eisentrager law for immigrants and aliens of psychosis, neurosis, or other mental disorders dorothea dix the humanitarian reformer for mental illness The rise of the dorothea dix the humanitarian.

Dorothea Dix Photo: Library of Congress Digital ID cph 3a Miss Dorothea Dix ( – ): Teacher, Nurse, Social Reformer and Advocate for the Mentally Ill by Dr.

Graham Warder, Keene State College. Dorothea Dix was born on April 4, in the frontier town of Hampden, Maine. Dix; Mental Health; Reform; Nineteenth Century. Dorothea Lynde Dix (born in Maine on 4 th April ) was one of the most influential social reformers of the nineteenth century.

Throughout her life, Dorothea Lynde Dix (–) worked in many different occupations to improve the lives of the less fortunate. Dix’s devotion to caring for others was evident from her youth. From an early age, Dorothea was a caregiver to her two younger brothers, and later, to her grandmother.

Dorothea Dix Photo: Library of Congress Digital ID cph 3a Miss Dorothea Dix ( – ): Teacher, Nurse, Social Reformer and Advocate for the Mentally Ill.

by Dr. Graham Warder, Keene State College. Dorothea Dix was born on April 4, in the frontier town of Hampden, Maine. Her father was poor, a drifter, and probably an alcoholic.

Dorothea Dix | History of American Women