Olive oatman and captivity narrative

Armstrong, Nancy, and Leonard Tennenhouse. U of California P,

Olive oatman and captivity narrative

Additional Information In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: T h e C a p t i v i t i e s o f O l i v e O a t m a n J e n n i f e r P u t z i In August ofthe Oatman family left Independence, Missouri, as part of a wagon train of Brewsterites, a Mormon splinter group traveling westward to the mouth of the Colorado River.

Their destination, located at the intersection of the current borders of Arizona, California, and Mexico, had been revealed to James C. Brewster by prophecy as the intended refuge of the Mormon people. O n February 18,while still miles from the fort, the Oatmans were attacked by Yavapai Indians.

Severely injured, fourteen-year-old Lorenzo managed to reunite with several Brewsterite families who had remained in the town of Pimole after their split from the Oatmans. Olive, thirteen years old, and Mary Ann, seven, were taken captive by the Yavapais, with whom they lived for about a year, until they were sold to the Mohave.

Mary A nn died of starvation after about two years, but Olive remained with the Mohave until February 22,when, ap-proximately five years after having been taken captive, she was apparently rescued and returned to Fort Yuma.

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Being an Interesting Narrative of the Captivity of the Oatman Girls, which first appeared in print in Written by Royal B. In the conclusion 1 7 8 W e s t e r n A m e r ic a n l it e r a t u r e SU M M ER 2 0 0 4 to the narrative, Stratton admits that the first-person point of view used throughout much of the narrative is a construction intended to evoke sympathy for Oatman and her family Although many of the locations in which she lectured remain unknown, Oatman appeared in cities throughout New York and Indiana.

The popularity of these lectures contributed to the success of Captivity of the Oatman Girls, which had sold 26, copies by Like a modern-day expose snatched from the headlines, Olive’s story was quickly packaged into an book by Royal B.

Stratton entitled Captivity of the Oatman Girls: Being an Interesting Narrative of Life among the Apache and Mohave Indians. Oatman, Lorenzo D. & Olive A. Oatman The Captivity of the Oatman Girls among the Apache and Mohave Indians Smith, Mary.

An Affecting Narrative of the Captivity and Suffering of Mrs. Mary Smith () Larimer, Sarah L. The Capture and the Escape or Life Among the Sioux ().

EBSCOhost serves thousands of libraries with premium essays, articles and other content including The Indian captivity narratives of Mary Rowlandson and Olive Oatman: Case studies in the.

Get access to over 12 million other articles! The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson Essay - The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson is a personal account, written by Mary Rowlandson in , of what life in captivity was like.

Images of Native Americans, an online exhibition presented by The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Royal B. Stratton LIFE AMONG THE INDIANS: BEING AN INTERESTING NARRATIVE OF THE CAPTIVITY OF THE OATMAN GIRLS, AMONG THE APACHE AND MOHAVE INDIANS.

Olive oatman and captivity narrative

“The Indian Captivity Narratives of Mary Rowlandson and Olive Oatman: Case Studies in the Continuity, Evolution, and Exploitation of Literary Discourse.” Studies in the Literary Imagination ():

Project MUSE - Capturing Identity in Ink: The Captivities of Olive Oatman