Steps of the water cycle

Thematic discussion While other existing wastewater databases often focus on percentage of sanitation coverage or pollution loads, AQUASTAT focuses on annual volumes at national level. The reason for choosing volume as the parameter is to facilitate the integration of these data in the water resources and use accounts in the different countries. The diagram put further below illustrates the flow of wastewater from production to use.

Steps of the water cycle

Check new design of our homepage! Water passes through all three states of matter during this cycle. Natural forces such as the sun, air, land, trees, river, seas, and mountains play an important part in completing the water cycle.

ScienceStruck Staff Last Updated: Jan 29, Correctly stated by the famous painter and sculptor, water is one of the most important substances on earth, as all living organisms require water to survive.

The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, can be defined as 'A continuous, endless and natural cycle of evaporation of water, subsequent condensation, and precipitation as rain and snow.

Steps of the water cycle

It heats up the water in seas, rivers, lakes and glaciers, which evaporates and rises up in the atmosphere. Water is also evaporated through plants and soil through a process called transpiration. This evaporated water is in the form of water vapor, which cannot be seen with naked eyes.

Step 2 This water vapor then comes in contact with air currents, which take it higher into the atmosphere. After reaching cooler temperatures, the water vapor condenses to form clouds, which contain millions of tiny droplets of water.

Step 3 These clouds move all round the globe and grow in size, collecting more water vapor on their way. When it becomes too heavy for the clouds to hold anymore water vapor, they burst and the droplets of water fall back on earth in the form of rain.

If the atmosphere is cold enough, the form of precipitation changes from rain to snow and sleet. Step 4 In the last step, rain or melted snow flows back into water bodies like rivers, lakes, and streams. Rainwater is also soaked up by the soil, through a process called infiltration.

AQUASTAT - FAO's Information System on Water and Agriculture

Some of the water also runs off the surface or seeps in the ground, which may later be seen as groundwater or freshwater springs. Eventually the water reaches the oceans, which are the largest water bodies and the biggest source of water vapor. This is a never-ending cycle, and all the water in the oceans and other water bodies is subject to this cycle, which is running continually.

The Processes Involved in the Water Cycle The water cycle happens to be a simple cycle, yet involves a lot of processes. Some of the processes that are involved are: When the heat of the sun causes water to turn to water vapor, it is known as evaporation.

As the water vapor moves higher in the atmosphere, it cools down due to a decrease in the temperature. On cooling, the water vapor condenses to form tiny droplets of water.

This process is known as condensation. The tiny droplets of water that are formed as a result of condensation keep on accumulating in the clouds.

Data sources, selection and validation

When a cloud can no longer accommodate any more water droplets, the water is released from them in the form of rain, hail, sleet, or snow.

The water that falls back to the surface of the earth either stays on the surface of the earth, or flows off the surface into water bodies like rivers, lakes and reservoirs.

This flow is termed as run-off. Plants absorb water from the soil and transport it to the leaves via the stem.Most will infiltrate (soak into) the ground and will collect as underground water.

The water cycle is powered by the sun's energy and by gravity.

Aquarium Disease Prevention | Steps to a Healthy Aquarium & Fish

The sun kickstarts the whole cycle by heating all the Earth's water and making it evaporate. Gravity makes the moisture fall back to Earth.

Liquid Waste (Sewage/Wastewater) Treatment Wastewater (liquid waste) from flushing the toilet, bathing, washing sinks and general cleaning goes down the drain and into a pipe, which joins a larger sewer pipe under the road.

Each single step requires a whole lifetime to complete. In fact, each step usually requires more than one lifetime. Typically, the entire journey of 35 steps takes well over a hundred lifetimes.

Getting Your Fish Tank Up and Running with Minimal Headaches

Earth's water is always in movement, and the natural water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth. The water cycle happens to be a simple cycle, yet involves a lot of processes.

Some of the processes that are involved are: Evaporation: When the heat of the sun causes water to turn to water vapor, it is known as evaporation. Condensation: As the water vapor moves higher in the atmosphere, it cools down due to a decrease in the temperature.

Nature does this job through a process called the water cycle. Also known as hydrologic cycle, the water cycle is a phenomenon where water moves through the three phases (gas, liquid and solid) over the four spheres (atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere) and completes a full cycle.

Krebs Cycle | Chemistry Learning